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Best Practice: Include Project Management Tasks in your Project Schedule

2010 January 27

Many project managers forget to include project planning in their Project schedules: reviewing and authorizing tasks and activities, project monitoring and reporting, reminding resources to update tasks and submit their updates, team meetings. These are involved in delivering successful projects, and are often the points that need the most attention from a project manager, so they should be included in your Project schedules.

 

One time PM tasks: Some tasks are specific to a particular stage of the project and occur only one-time, such as writing the project initiation request or developing the project budget. For these, create either a task in the sequence where you will perform it, like any other task.

Stage-specific Recurring Tasks: Some project management tasks are specific to a stage or an activity in a project. E.g., Monitoring and controlling project performance. Insert a Recurring Task at the bottom of the activity (just before the milestone for that activity). Project will automagically populate the date range of the recurring task based on date range of the activity. If it does not, you can adjust the date range manually.

 

Project-long Recurring Tasks: Many project management tasks are routine and recur throughout the duration of the project or from one point in the project to the end of a particular stage, such as project team meetings. Insert a Recurring Task at the project level (Outline Level 1) at the bottom of the Project Schedule, which will set it to coincide with the project start date and finish on the project finish date (for tasks that will occur throughout the project lifecycle) or at the date of end of the project stage at which this recurring task will end. Inserting a Recurring Task at the bottom of your schedule helps prevent inadvertently linking it with false dependencies and lengthening your schedule in unexpected ways.